The traces of mankind…


[we] come from nature.…There is an importance to [having] a certain reverence for what nature is because we are connected to it… If we destroy nature, we destroy ourselves.” – Edward Burtynsky

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Photo credit: Edward Burtynsky

When you think about how little a human-being is compared to the size of our planet it’s only hard to imagine what great impact we still have. For millennia human-beings have exploited the resources of nature. In the course of time mankind has developed more and more modern methods to reach even more resources. To achieve this new technologies and machines have been created. The number of the natural resources people need for their constantly changing lifestyle is also increasing. We keep changing our planet and leaving traces every day, even if we may not really be aware of it.

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David Uzochukwu


David Uzochukwu, born in the Tyrol, Austria, in 1998, is called a child prodigy in photography. At the age of 18 he already collaborated with Adobe and Instagram, presented his work in New York and was finally discovered by Vogue Italia.

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It’s his particular style to combine strong and brilliant colors in wonderful intense tones and special backgrounds given by nature with the fragility of often naked and imperfect bodies. His models symbolize vulnerability and human strength at the same time, arousing different emotions when you look at them. When you look at his photos you get drawn into an apparently surreal world he’s produced and you get carried away by the somber scenes he’s created in his photos.

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Tom Hoying – Scenic View


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Photo : Tom Hoying

Whoever has been on vacation within the last ten years must have noticed one obvious trend –cameras and smartphones are everywhere. Sometimes, when visiting a spectacular or meaningful place, all you encounter are people experiencing it through their lenses or screens.
I’m not one to judge here, because I regularly catch myself doing the same. I wouldn’t want to miss my photo memoirs, but one thing for sure, whenever I see scenes like that, I wonder if this whole, “capturing the moment on photo or video”- thing didn’t get out of hand and it might rob us from the real experience instead.

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Russia – photographed by Frank Herfort


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Ever since I was a child Russia has fascinated me. The reason for this may have been all those old Russian fairytales or the simple fact that, when compared to other parts of the world, I hardly knew or, to be more exact, I do not know a lot about the real Russia.

As a child I imagined Russia as a snowy fairytale land, as a country where people cuddled up in warm furry blankets ride horse-drawn sleighs. As I grew older I kept reading a lot of Russian classics such as Anna Karenina or The Seagull. Of course, I had a very romantic and unrealistic image of Russia in mind, and the older I grew the more I started to realize that things actually weren’t this way in reality. But to be honest, up until today I don’t really know much about life in Russia and I still haven’t been there.

The other day I found this article about Frank Herfort, a German photographer who lives and works in Moscow and Germany.

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Inge Morath


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Photo: Inge Morath

“Photography is a strange phenomenon. In spite of the use of that technical instrument, the camera, no two photographers, even if they were at the same place at the same time, come back with the same pictures. The personal vision is usually there from the beginning; result of a special chemistry of background and feelings, traditions and their rejection, of sensibility and voyeurism. You trust your eye and you cannot help but bare your soul. One’s vision finds of necessity the form suitable to express it.”

Inge Morath, Life as a Photographer, 1999

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Photo walk in the snowy mountains


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After the first long-awaited snowfall I didn’t want to stay in my apartment any longer last weekend. In order to have light and flexible baggage to carry this time I decided once again after a long time for my compact all-round lens, the SIGMA 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM. With this lens I had a wonderful range of fixed focal lengths suitable for every subject. The intense consistent open aperture of 2.8 allows nice bokeh and a great depth of field even though it’s an APSC camera.

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Unequal Scenes


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There’s no doubt that drone photography and a bird’s eye view which is becoming more and more popular have been a clear trend in the world of photography for quite some time.

No wonder because they allow you a perspective that human-beings aren’t likely to experience otherwise.

It’s these new perspectives that form the work created by Johnny Miller. In his last projects the photographer has dedicated himself to drone photography and what he shoots isn’t breathtaking sceneries or spectacular images in cities. With his photos he rather highlights the striking contrasts between rich and poor.

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Szymon Barylski – Fleeing Death


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The war in Syria is a very up-to-date issue for more than five years now. Nevertheless people don’t really look at it and many people, primarily those in the Western world, aren’t aware of the extent of this tragedy. A man who wants to change this is Szymon Barylski.

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100 most influential photos of all times


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Photos are important historical documents and their significance is permanently increasing. We are living in a visual world where sometimes things are only considered to be true when there’s a photo, or even better, a video as a piece of evidence.
Thanks to smartphones and their integrated cameras millions of photos are taken every day and in almost every single corner of the world. The importance of photography for this generation probably cannot be fully understood yet, but one thing’s for sure: There hasn’t been a period in history when it was possible to gain such deep insights into people’s lives and into almost every social class.

However, photos have certainly been enormously important before the rise of the smartphone industry. All of us probably know the photo taken by Kim Phúc, also known as the “Napalm Girl”. She was nine years old when Nick Ùt, a Vietnamese photographer, took a photo of her screaming in pain, escaping burnt and fully naked. It was that image that revealed the real horrors and the actual dimensions of the Vietnam War to the public.

With the “100 Photos” project “THE TIMES” aims to present a list of the 100 most influential photographs of all times and then to find and tell the stories behind these pictures. It’s pretty obvious to everyone that this isn’t an easy task at all.
How to make a selection of 100 photos among all the pictures taken over a period of 200 years?  You can read on the project website how difficult it was to create such a selection. The team had to conduct thousands of expert interviews with photographers, historians, curators and editors all over the world. Whenever it was possible friends and family members of the people portrayed in the pictures had to be contacted. You can see the final list of the 100 photos and their stories on the project website.