Gear Avoidance Syndrome? Huh?


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We as photographers are not the only creative ones who are extremely susceptible to “gear acquisition syndrome”. There are said to be many musicians who have difficulty resisting new musical instruments. The symptoms, however, are always the same: the bank account is abruptly plundered even though you already own several guitars, drums or cameras and lenses. We all know that new and better gear is not the key to getting better. Still, in some situations we give in to the want-desire. Personally, I don’t know a single photographer who doesn’t care about gear, and who solely relies on practice to improve their skills instead of thinking about certain shortcuts. This article on Neoprime, however, suggests that there are photographers suffering from “gear avoidance syndrome” who warmly recommend passing this disease on to others. Besides more money in your wallet, other advantages are an improved creativity and a perception that is better adjusted to the perspective of the lens. It is advised to just own a single camera and fixed focal length, and to simply sell it and buy a new one with another focal length if you ever grow tired of it.

Sometimes I wake up soaked in sweat because I dreamed that I didn’t own any other lens besides a 21mm (full frame equivalent) fixed focal length. Jokes apart, I sleep like a log, but I still cannot imagine using only a single wide angle, let alone owning only one such lens. Just as little can I imagine to ever grow tired of the normal focal length. Thus my advice: it is better to own several lenses, but to only take one with you in order to do some photographic brain jogging. 😉

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2 thoughts on “Gear Avoidance Syndrome? Huh?

  1. I guess we only have to think more about what we have and what we really don’t need, and not be extreme about not buying anything, or buying everything.
    It’s awesome to have lots and lots of lenses, but it doesn’t count too much on our experience etc.

    • I guess we only have to think more about what we have and what we really don’t need, and not be extreme about not buying anything, or buying everything.
      It’s awesome to have lots and lots of lenses, but it doesn’t count too much on our experience etc.

      I agree. I think it’s better to have only a couple of great lenses, which you know that you need and will use almost every day, than to have a dozen of mediocre lenses, most of which will only be used several times per year.

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